News/Columns Sept 2020

THE GREAT OUTDOORS, by Larry Whiteley

The Great Outdoors

THE GREAT OUTDOORS

By Larry Whiteley

FALL’S FORAGING CRAPPIE

In the fall, crappie head to the shallows and they are hungry. They migrate to secondary bays and creeks much like they do during the spring spawn. Forage is what brings the fish to shallow brush piles, stump rows and standing timber.

Cooler temperatures get shad moving in schools of unbelievable numbers. As they travel they feed on zoo plankton and photo plankton and the crappies are in hot pursuit. In most places 5 to 10 feet will produce. It’s a jig fisherman’s paradise with color choices, like in all seasons, depending on water conditions.

The predictable weather, stable lake levels, calm winds, beautiful countryside, ample launch ramp parking and aggressive crappie all combine together for great fall crappie fishing.

DARK SKIES AND GLOOMY DAYS

You may not like to fish with dark skies and gloomy days, cool rain and dropping barometric pressure but if you don’t you may be missing out on some great fishing.

The rain doesn’t bother the fish since they’re wet anyway. The dark, gloomy day may bring fish shallower since they are not trying to get away from the sun. Even though the air temperature drops 10 or 12 degrees the water temperature may drop just a degree or two and that usually triggers fish feeding activity.

THE LAST WISH

Family and friends of the late Peter Hodge of Puriton, England fulfilled the avid angler’s last wish by mixing his cremated remains with maize, hemp and soya, then launching the resulting fish bait into his favorite fishing hole. Hmm! I wonder if you could do the same thing with Berkley Crappie Nibbles.

STRANGE BUT TRUE

When New Zealander Les Holland’s cell phone died, he decided it might still be useful for catching a fish. Attaching a hook, sinker and swivel, he cast it out and caught a 4-foot long barracuda.

DUCK!

Workers from White’s Mobile Home Supply in Arkansas were hanging around near a trailer during a rain storm when lightning struck nearby. They came out from under the home only to be greeted by a sight they will never forget.

“About 20 to 30 seconds after the lightning struck something started falling from the sky,” owner Ron White said.

At first, they thought it was tennis shoes. Then they realized it was ducks and proceeded to collect 20 mallards from the mobile home parking lot.

“Lightning can hit ducks, but it is rare,” said a spokesperson for the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. “I think this is something though that they will remember for the rest of their lives.”

AVERAGE LIFE SPANS IN THE WILD

Bullfrog – 4 years (Can you imagine the legs on that thing?)

Deer – 4.5 years (As a deer hunter that amazes me or maybe not.)

Duck – 3 years (It takes one lucky duck to avoid all those duck hunters.)

Rabbit – 1-2 years (Maybe their feet aren’t so lucky?)

Squirrel – 3-4 years (Not if I catch them in my bird feeders!)

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT

 “Look at where Jesus went to pick people. He didn’t go to the colleges… he got guys off the fishing docks.” ~ Jeff Foxworthy

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